The Buckley School

  • Address

    3900 Stansbury Ave., Sherman Oaks

  • Phone

    818-783-1610

  • Website

    buckley.org 

  • Photographed by

    Wessam Hazaymeh

  • Special Section

    All About Kids

The Buckley School originated with a preschool on the Westside founded by Dr. Isabelle Buckley in 1933 and today is located in a beautiful Sherman Oaks canyon. Led by head of school Alona Scott, Buckley is a member of the Sherman Oaks Chamber of Commerce and enjoys relationships with neighboring residents and business owners.


How does your school empower kids and give them a voice?

“The K–12 makeup of our school and its moderately small size allow for nurturing student-adult relationships and programs founded by students that reflect their interests. The Empathy and Uplift Project for sixth graders and Intersections of Identity for ninth graders, along with the dynamic Student Voice newspaper, are just a few ways students are empowered to communicate compellingly and authentically.” 


What does your school offer that makes kids say “Wow!”?

“Our students love our culture clubs in lower school and our wide array of Beyond the Bell after-school classes. In middle school they love creating in our makerspace, competing on sports teams, engaging in a Passion Project and learning Chinese. In upper school, students are excited to be a part of a theatrical production; join a club; become an editor of the newspaper; help design symposia on diversity, equity, inclusion and justice; and play on varsity teams. The beauty of Buckley is that you can follow as many of your interests as you like.”


Does your school give kids a window into other cultures?

“Our mission asserts a commitment to equity and inclusion. Creating a nurturing learning environment in which all students feel a sense of belonging is our schoolwide aspiration, and we work toward this goal with programming comprised of windows into the experiences of others and mirrors that reflect students’ own identities. Our innovative teachers shine a light on many cultures and perspectives, shepherding students into becoming empathic and self-actualized adults.”


Does your school appeal to kids through technology or help them step away from it?

“We both embrace technology and understand the importance of stepping away from it. While it is always an important learning tool in the room, it can also be a distraction from learning. We have both a no cell phone policy on campus during the school day for all students K–12 as well as a robotics room, digital music lab, video production studio, and a new media and tech lab. Navigating this balance is tricky but necessary.”